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Maternal and Child Health Bureau logoA Health Professionals Guide to Pediatric Oral Health Management
HomeModuleModule 1: An Introduction to Infants' and Young Children's Oral HealthModule 2: Managing Infants' and Young Children's Oral HealthModule 3: Oral Conditions and AbnormalitiesModule 4: Prevention of Oral DiseaseModule 5: Non-Nutritive Sucking HabitsModule 6: Oral InjuryModule 7: Infants and Young Children with Special Health Care NeedsContentsGlossaryEvaluationHelp
Module 6: Oral Injury
Module Contents
Overview
6.1 Injury Prevention
Anticipatory Guidance
6.2 Child Abuse and Neglect
6.3 Injury Types and Consequences
Injury Types
Injury Consequences (current page)
6.4 Managing Oral Injuries
Avulsed Teeth
Key Points
Post-Test
References
Additional Resources



6.3 Injury Types and Consequences

Injury Consequences

photo close-up of child with oral trauma
  Fig 2. Discoloration Caused by Injury




A common consequence of injury to primary teeth is discoloration, which is due to damage to the pulp and its blood supply (Figure 2).

Intrusion injuries can occur when a primary tooth is pushed into the alveolar bone as a result of the force of the impact. A very early intruded primary tooth can affect the developing permanent teeth. Depending on the stage of development at the time when the intrusion occurs, the permanent tooth may erupt with a hypoplastic or a hypocalcified enamel surface. (See Module 3, section 3.5, Hypoplasia and Hypocalcification.)

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logo: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau