Module 3: Tooth Surface Assessment and Selection
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Module 3 Post-Test Self-Assessment

  1. A caries lesion that exhibits evidence of progression or change over time is:
    1. A remineralized lesion.
    2. An active lesion.
    3. A residual lesion.
    4. A non-cavitated lesion.

  2. What type of caries lesion is a demineralized lesion without evidence of cavitation?
    1. A cavitation.
    2. An incipient lesion or white spot.
    3. Abfraction.
    4. Secondary caries.

  3. Which of the following characteristics may help in determining whether a non-cavitated lesion is active without following a patient over time?
    1. Active lesions can be whitish or yellowish in color but tend to be shiny or glossy. Inactive lesions tend to be whitish or yellowish in color and opaque (non-glossy).
    2. Inactive lesions feel hard and smooth when the tip of the explorer is moved gently across their surface. Active lesions feel rough when the tip of the explorer is moved gently across their surface.
    3. Active lesions are located far away from the gingival margin when the lesion is in a smooth surface. Inactive lesions are located closer to the gingival margin when the lesion is in a smooth surface.
    4. All of the above

  4. Is the following statement true or false?
    A dentist examines a 7-year-old for the first time and notices several whitish demineralized areas in the buccal enamel of many teeth that are covered by dental plaque and that are opaque and rough to the touch. The clinician determines that these are active caries lesions. What the dentist has done is referred to as diagnosis.
    1. True
    2. False

  5. According to the American Dental Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, for children at high risk for dental caries, dental sealants are indicated for which of the following?
    1. Sound pit-and-fissure surfaces.
    2. Non-cavitated pit-and-fissure surfaces.
    3. Cavitated pit-and-fissure surfaces.
    4. Sound pit-and-fissure surfaces and non-cavitated pit-and-fissure surfaces.
    5. Non-cavitated pit-and-fissure surfaces and cavitated pit-and-fissure surfaces.

  6. A dentist in a school-based dental sealant program using an explorer to examine an occlusal surface should:
    1. Use the explorer forcefully to determine which surfaces will cavitate.
    2. Use the explorer gently to feel for softness.
    3. Use the explorer forcefully to feel for surface texture.
    4. Use the explorer gently when in doubt to confirm cavitation.

  7. Is the following statement true or false?
    The use of 2.5x loupes will result in much more accurate detection of caries lesions.
    1. True.
    2. False.